On May 5th we raise awareness and prayers in honoring our Missing and Murdered Indigenous relatives as we continue the fight to bring greater focus and increased action towards safety, Indigenous based research, and political change for the protection of our Indigenous sisters. Our prayers are with each and every family that continues to grieve and fight for justice for aunties, sisters, mothers, grandmothers, and daughters as we continue to seek justice and peace for all of our sacred Indigenous relatives.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Awareness Day 2021

We are deeply saddened at the continued injustices which continue to terrorize our relatives in our Black communities. As Indigenous people, we understand deeply, the crippling impacts of systemic racism in America, and we stand with and for, all who continue to fight to bring justice for Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and so many others. We understand that the United States was built upon colonization, slavery, and genocide and we join hands in solidarity, demanding justice for centuries of violent oppression. Sending prayers that our voices will be heard in our work towards creating a more inclusive and supportive society for all.

August 31, 2020

Mother Nation’s Executive Director Norine Hill was featured by The Seattle Times in support of implementing database changes which will now track tribal affiliation in King County databases.

Read article here: After push from Native organizations, King County will add tribal affiliations to its homelessness database

Mother Nation’s 2019 Healing the Spirit Gathering at Lummi Nation Silver Reef Resort. Highlights of Wes Shore singers and dancers tribute to honor MMIW.

October 14th, 2019: Mother Nation was honored to lead the 2019 Indigenous People’s Day march in Seattle, WA.

October 7, 2019

Native women face disproportionately high rates of sexual violence, domestic abuse — even murder. The Justice Department estimates that 1 in 3 Native women will be raped. Part of the problem is that tribes are restricted in their ability to prosecute, so abusers and predators are attracted to these unprotected women. In Seattle, Norine Hill, who is a member of the Oneida Nation of the Thames, has founded Mother Nation to help women out of abusive situations and bring them culturally appropriate services so they can rediscover their strength. In this incredibly powerful podcast, we explore some of the historical injustices inflicted on Native Americans, while also sharing Hill’s dramatic personal tale that led her to found Mother Nation.

Link to podcast–> Ep. 36: Revisiting ‘Helping Native American Women Heal’

May 7, 2018

Bringing Healing to Native Women – The Story Exchange by Colleen DeBaise

February 8, 2018

Link–> The Seattle Times: Native Americans, Seattle’s original residents, are homeless at highest rate

Photo by Ken Lambert, courtesy of seattletimes.com

 May 12, 2017

Link–> Seattle P-I: Mother Nation healing the trauma of native women

Courtesy of seattlepi.com

April 19, 2017

Link–> Real Change: Nonprofit agency helps fill the gaps in services for Native American women

Courtesy of realchangenews.org

March 8, 2017

Listen to Grammy award-winner, Star Nayea’s beautiful song for Mother Nation’s launch on International Women’s Day, March 8th, 2017.

January 27, 2017

Mother Nation’s Norine Hill speaks about the National Women’s March held January, 21st, 2017 in Washington, D.C., with over 5 million women marching world wide. Listen to her radio interview where she talked with CBC North host Christopher Herodier about Indigenous women representing at the historic march.

October 6, 2015

Watch Ellena’s Story of Truth